Widescreen Review Webzine | HD DVD Review | Lethal Weapon

BLU-RAY REVIEW

Lethal Weapon

Featured In Issue 111, August 2006

Picture4
Sound2.5
WSR Score
Basic Information on new release titles is posted as soon as titles are announced. Once reviewed, additional data is added to the database.
(Studio/Distributor):
Warner Home Video
(Catalog Number):
80080
(MPAA Rating):
R
(Rating Reason):
NA
(Retail Price):
$28.99
(Disc Type):
Single Side, Dual Layer (HD-30)
(Widescreen Edition):
Yes
(Full Screen Edition):
No
(Running Time In Minutes):
110
(Color Type):
Color
(Chaptered/Scene Access):
Yes
(Closed Captioned):
Yes
(Regional Coding):
1
(Theatrical Year):
1987
(Theatrical Release):
Yes
(Direct-To-Video Release):
No
(Disc Release Date):
06/27/06
(THX® Digitally Mastered):
No
(Director):
Richard Donner
(Screenplay/Written By):
(Story):
(Music):
(Director Of Photography):
(Production Designer):
(Visual Effects):
(Costume Designer):
(Editor):
(Supervising Sound Editors):
(Re-Recording Mixers):
(Executive Producers):
(Co-Producers):
(Producers):
(Academy Awards):
(Principal Photography):
(Theatrical Aspect Ratio):
(Measured Disc Aspect Ratio):
(Disc Soundtrack):
Dolby Digital+ 5.1
(Theatrical Sound):
(Theatrical Re-Issue Soundtrack):
(DTS Bit Rate):
(Dolby Digital Bit Rate):
(Additional Languages):
(French Language):
(Spanish Language):
(Chinese Language):
(Subtitles):
(Cantonese Language):
(Mandarin Language):
(Japanese Language):
(Italian Language):
(German Language):
(Portuguese Language):

Lethal Weapon is the thrill packed story of two cops—both of whom hate to work with partners. Gibson and Glover star as the wild-eyed, burnt-out Martin Riggs and the easygoing Roger Murtaugh. But their partnership becomes the key to their survival when, in the period of 48 hours, a routine murder investigation leads to an all-out war with an international heroine ring. You better duck quick, because this film fires fast action scenes like bullets, but you don't want to miss a thing!

There are two special features: about five minutes of non-chaptered deleted scenes and the theatrical trailer.

The high-definition 1.78:1 HD DVD picture looks fantastic for the age of the film, with well-balanced color fidelity and excellent textures and details, although some softness is inherent. No obtrusive VC-1 compression artifacts are noticed. While the picture doesn't have the slick look of new titles on HD, this is a promising example of how well an older film can transfer to high-definition. (Suzanne Hodges)

Unfortunately, Warner did not deem it necessary to remix the classic soundtrack when encoding it with the new Dolby® Digital Plus codec, so the soundtrack still sounds like a repurposed Dolby Surround release. Dialogue is often ADR-produced and still sounds manufactured, although fidelity is slightly increased with the increased bit rate Dolby Digital Plus affords. Heavy background noise can dilute the naturalness of the soundtrack. (Danny Richelieu)